, ,

Migration of Nucleus Pulposus

Treatment strategies related to intervertebral disc displacement often involves extension. Robin McKenzie’s work on centralization of symptoms in the case of disc herniation has been used by many.  Most of the research on migration nucleus pulposus has been previously investigated in the lumbar spine. In a recent study published in PM&R 1 , researchers looked at the cervical spine and wondered if this was a similar case. They hypothesized that cervical extension would centralize and shift the nucleus anterior–away from the associated disc herniation.

They looked at 10 healthy young males with mean age of 22 yrs old and compared neutral to extension position of the cervical discs using MRI. They carefully mapped out the nucleus pulposus and found that in extension the migration nucleus pulposus was anterior and away from the posterior disc margin.

They concluded that moving the cervical spine into extension could be clinically valuable in the case of cervical disc problems.

At Dynamic Disc Designs, we have seen what these researchers have seen! When our handcrafted models (with an annulus and nucleus) are moved into extension, the nucleus can been seen to move anterior. In our lumbar models, the clear L4 vertebra of our Professional LxH Model allows full migration visibility of the nucleus pulposus. This is helpful in the clinical explanation of treatment targets for patients with intervertebral disc problems.

migration nucleus pulposus, lumbar model

Posterior nucleus migration in flexion.

  1.  Kim YH, Kim SI, Park S, Hong SH, Chung SG Effects of Cervical Extension on Deformation of Intervertebral Disk and Migration of Nucleus Pulposus. PM R. 2016 Sep 6. pii: S1934-1482(16)30905-4. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.08.027. [Epub ahead of print
,

Can you guess the symptoms?

cervical spine, model, uncovertebral

Cervical x-rays can tell the ordering clinician a great deal in identifying the source of a patients symptoms. In this image, can you guess the symptoms in this 67 year old female?

Cliff Tao DC DACBR Owner and Chiropractic Radiologist Orange County, California Area,Medical Practice helps bring important topics to the forefront.

uncovertebral hypertrophy, models

At Dynamic Disc Designs, we use real cadaveric bone specimens for the development of our models. Here is a cervical specimen showing one of the radiological findings above.

cervical spine, model

The uncovertebral joint (also known as Luschka’s joints) are hook-like processes (From Latin uncus ‎(hook)) that are small synovial joints that reside on the lateral aspect of the the cervical vertebra. They are most commonly found from C3-C7 and can become hypertophied leading to potential nerve root encroachment.

Our Professional CxH Model does represent this anatomy in discussions of uncovertebral hypertrophy.

 

, , ,

Cervical Disc Anatomy Model Helps Learn About Injuries

cervical model, anatomy

Cervical Disc Anatomy Model Helps One Learn About Neck Injuries

If you’ve ever been a student of anatomy, there’s a huge chance that you spent many a night staring blankly at the pages of your text book and the photographs and drawings inside. The human body is a complicated system as millions of mechanisms are occurring at once and to understand it – even if you’re really into the science surrounding it – can be quite difficult. There are so many bones, tissues, tendons, organs, nerves, etc. and each one has its place and its purpose.
Anatomy students – as well as students of particular medical disciplines – spend a lot of time studying artists’ rendering of the parts underneath our skin. We try to picture how they’d really look if we could see them or how they’d feel if we could touch them. If you have been a student of the spine – be it a chiropractor, a spine surgeon, or perhaps a physiotherapist – you’ve certainly spent a good amount of time with those drawings, trying to understand how the parts of the spine move and what happens when things go wrong.
But perhaps those who teach spinal anatomy, chiropractic, or any number of other anatomy-related courses, could use something that would enhance the teachings of it. Rather than offering high-quality drawings of the spine to students for study, they should be prepared to offer their students something much better – 3D dynamic models like the cervical disc anatomy model and others offered by Dynamic Disc Designs.

cervical, disc, anatomy, model
Good spinal health for patients starts with good educational tools for future doctors and other caretakers of the spine. A classroom equipped with a cervical disc anatomy model, or any of the more than two dozen models offered by Dr. Jerome Fryer of Dynamic Disc Designs (ddd), is a classroom where true hands-on and  takes place.
Designed and originally rafted by a highly-experienced chiropractor, these lumbar and cervical models take learning out of the text books and put it in the hands of students, where their fingers can manipulate the discs in a dynamic way. With these models, future spine surgeons, for example, understand what they need to do to make their patients better in a patient education platform they can trust. Up-and-coming chiropractors better understand the specifics of manipulation therapy and the value of an adjustment to the spine. And physiotherapists can picture how their stretches and exercises will help their clients achieve better spine health.
“Dynamic Disc Designs spinal segmental models are unique in many ways and represent a new standard in quality and anatomical detail far superior to any of their predecessors. Their value far exceeds their cost,” explains Ara Deukmedjian MD CEO of the Deuk Spine Institute.
“The ddd models have helped me as an instructor in a DPT program show a more realistic anatomical representation of the human spine,” adds physical therapy instructor Stephen Elam. “This helps the students have a more accurate image of the spine in their head and allows them to have a stronger anatomy foundation.”

<iframe width=”853″ height=”480″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/zjUXkpuoHJs?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>
Dynamic Disc Design cervical disc anatomy models and other carefully-crafted spine models are available individually or as a package. Choose one or several to improve how you educate the spine care professionals of tomorrow.

, , ,

Cervical Spine Anatomical Model

A cervical spine model with a herniated disc - for medical professionals

A Cervical Spine Anatomical Model Sheds Light on a Complex System

 

The cervical spine – more commonly known as the neck – is a complex configuration of the seven vertebral bodies that make up the upper part of the spine. But you already knew that, right?

If you are a doctor or other professional who works with issues of the cervical spine, chances are you’ve studied this part of the anatomy in depth and that you know all about the particulars of C1 through C7 and understand the importance of a healthy cervical spine. Good for you!

Of course, if you’re a patient who’s having cervical spine problems, including severe neck pain, you’re probably not too adept at figuring out why it is that you’re hurting and what you can do to ease the pain. That’s why you’re going to a chiropractor, physiotherapy, massage therapist, or other professional. You hope that you’ll walk away with answers.

So, if you’re that medical professional to which people turn when they have cervical spine pain, what do YOU do to help them clearly understand what’s gone wrong inside their body? In many cases, we – as professionals – enjoy using our words to explain to our patients why they are in pain. We’ve all been there, most likely on both sides of the fence. You’ve no doubt done the explaining and have also been explained to…at least sometime during your life. But, being a medical professional, you’re at an advantage. You can largely understand what another doctor is explaining to you. Your patients may not fare as well.

zygapophyseal joints

But with visual aids, your verbal explanation can go a lot further. If cervical pain is your specialty, you should consider an investment in an education tool that tells the whole story through the sense of sight and touch, such as Dynamic Disc Design’s cervical spine anatomical models.

The company’s Professional CxH model, for example, provides patients (or students of cervical spine pathologies) a close look at the inner workings of this part of the body’s nervous system. It includes a two-part intervertebral disc with six degrees of natural motion with a red post-lateral nuclear migration upon manual compression, posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL), anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) and periosteal fascia (POL) (adjacent to uncovertebral joint). Doctors find this model extremely helpful for discussions involving pain related to the uncovertebral joint, IVF narrowing, and dynamic disc changes related to the facets. A ligamentum flavum is available as an extra feature.

While the Professional CxH model is the most comprehensive 3D cervical spine anatomical model offered, Dynamic Disc Design’s also produces a cervical spinal stenosis model, an upper cervical model, a hypermobility cervical model, and a multi-level, multi-coloured cervical model. There’s also the one-of-a-kind Cervical Prox1.

Offering clients a look at a cervical spine anatomical model has a few distinct advantages. First of all, because many individuals learn best from visuals, they walk away with a clearer understanding of their problems. In addition, patients who truly believe they’ve “connected” with their doctor and believe that their doctor “understands them” are the ones that return. In short, you’ve helped them develop confidence in your knowledge and your abilities. That sort of connection makes for life-long patients.

Dynamic Disc Designs’ cervical spine anatomical models are affordable, even for those just starting their practice, and because they are well-made with careful attention to detail, they are not only super-accurate but also long-lasting, making them a sound investment for any doctor who treats the cervical spine. Check out the available selection and choose one or more that fit your needs.

, ,

Chiropractic Models – Helping to Improve Outcomes

Chiropractic Models - Dynamic Disc Designs

Chiropractic Models help with outcomes.

Doctors of chiropractic use chiropractic models to educate patients on the anatomy in question. Often patients just want to know where and why it hurts and how can the chiropractor relieve the symptoms.

Pain can come from a few common spots in the spine. The lumbar or cervical discs, themselves, can cause pain and are known to house nerves primarily on the outside of the intervertebral discs but also can migrate into the core when degenerated.

Models that show this kind of pain have only been developed by Dynamic Disc Designs with a lens to see inside the disc contents. This type of pain usually presents with sitting and also in the morning upon first get up.

Other common painful anatomical sites include the facet joint which often presents with pain in those patients that have pain bending backwards or prolonged standing.

Chiropractic models can also be useful when they can create and audible cracking or snapping sound. The Oracle Model has been recently developed for chiropractors to help in the patient’s understanding of the adjustment. This innovative product can generate the audible release of a chiropractic adjustment.

When patients understand that flexion stresses the posterior (or back of) the discs where the delicate nerves exit, they make changes to their lifestyle to minimize harmful movements after treatment. Having patients understand this simple principle will aid in the doctor-patient team to get the best possible outcomes for treatment. Visible particles in the nucleus can be seen now and easily demonstrated with Dynamic Disc Designs models. Innovation to improve outcomes.

, , ,

Back Pain with Sitting

sitting and back pain

Many people experience back pain with sitting.

In a recent study published in the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation titled : Changes in Lumbar Disk Morphology Associated With Prolonged Sitting Assessed by MagneticResonance Imaging  these authors used mid sagittal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate continuous sitting and sitting with positional changes every 15 minutes.

They asked subjects in one group to sit continuous for 4 hrs while comparing a group that would stand up every 15 minutes and perform 5 seconds of lumbar flexion, 5 seconds of lumbar extension, 5 seconds of lumbar bending to the right, and then 5 seconds of lumbar bending to the left before returning to a seated position.

They did not find any significant changes in the disc morphology except at L4-5 after day 1 but not day 2 and concluded that L4-5 height changes were not significant with brief positional changes every 15 minutes.

At Dynamic Disc Designs, Dr. Jerome Fryer reviews papers to continue to develop models for professionals. He applauds the authors of this paper and finds the results of the manuscript predictable.  He explains ” the discs respond to unloading forces. If one suspects the discs as the pain generator associated with sitting, then postural strategies to improve disc health should include unloading forces” like in his paper, Magnetic resonance imaging and stadiometric assessment of the lumbar discs after sitting and chair-care decompression exercise: a pilot study whereby changes to disc were seen using the upper extremities to unload during positional changes of 15 minutes of sitting

If the net forces with positional changes are in the constant direction of gravity, (I.E, – y ) then the discs do not get a significant break
-Dr. Jerome Fryer explains

He also understands that his research is limited by way of subjects, but continues to see outcomes in practice with this type of off loading strategy.

As we continue to move forward in a world of more sitting, strategies that include off loading of the spine will be of more interest.  The intervertebral discs are hydraulic structures that lose up to 25% of height over the course of the day while vertical. Recumbancy and sleep has already showed how these structures recover. Sivian et al. showed in Biorheology how the disc cells behave. If we do not off load the discs, they will not have a chance to recover.

Dynamic Disc Designs continues to develop lumbar models and cervical models to help explain research in hopes to develop better techniques to improve spine health with our ever increasing world of technology and back pain with sitting.

, ,

Cervical Spine Models

Dynamic Cervical Model

Cervical spine models, handcrafted to deliver the most accurate of spine models to spine professionals.

Dynamic Disc Designs has been leading the way in 3d models for over 8 years now. Recently, at the request of the customers, Dr. Jerome Fryer (Chief Innovations Officer) decided it was time to construct a dynamic full multilevel cervical model.

With details extracted from real human cadaveric specimens, this latest multilevel cervical model includes the axis and atlas with the cruciform ligament. Upper cervical injuries are common in motor vehicle, work related, and sport accidents. Personal injury lawyers as well as surgeons and chiropractors have been utilizing Dynamic Disc models to educate the injuries.

With a dynamically designed intervertebral disc and ligamentum flavum, at the levels of C1-7, this new model includes the cruciform ligament and demonstrates hypermobility at C1-2. C6-7 shows a central disc herniation under load.

Subscribe on Youtube channel

Dynamic Disc Designs continues to listen to the feedback given from its customers in the push to deliver the best teaching tools to improve outcomes or settle cases in and out of court with personal injury cases. We have been a leader in teaching aids to help professionals connect with people in the discussion of spine pain generators in finding the most suitable treatment for each case. Ligament instability is a common outcome in motor vehicle accidents as our imaging strategies using upright MRI now allow us to see these conditions under dynamic spinal motion.