Do Concepts of Stability and Instability Matter for Back Pain

A clinical commentary 1 in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy was conducted to see if the concepts of stability and instability had any value when talking about Back Pain. The commentary’s argument was that the view of stability needed to be broadened and should also integrate interdisciplinary knowledge. Such a change was deemed necessary due to the complex nature of back pain.

What did it set out to do?

The current clinical commentary had the objective of providing a broad definition of stability. It showed how a unifying framework could be used to integrate different interpretations of spine stability. Furthermore, basic and clinical studies were examined to determine the link of spine stability to back pain. Recent scientific, as well as technological advancements, were also considered. The commentary also speculated on how to evolve the concept of stability (in a manner that also addresses non-mechanical issues lined to experiencing pain).

The main goal of the commentary was to display critical knowledge gathered from studying the concepts of stability and to share the potential present in understanding the etiology concerned with back pain.

Disc Herniation

 

Did it reach the intended goal?

While lumbar spine stability was the focus of this commentary, it was determined that similar concepts could still be used when covering different forms of back pain.

It shared that stability is linked to the central nervous system and how neural and mechanical coupling can help reduce the risk of instability connected to a healthy spine.

The commentary talked about how the messaging surrounding the human spine and its susceptibility should be made better for the general public’s understanding. A better understanding can also help reduce the likelihood of maladaptive strategies. A systems-based framework can also prove beneficial for interdisciplinary integration of knowledge; something this commentary stated needed improvement in the spine community.

The basic conclusion was that we still have a lot to learn about back pain. However, using a framework and using the potential that still exists, we can make the spine community efficient to help others.

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