Facet Joints, GAG, Annulus Fibrosus, Torsion

A recent study evaluated the role of facet joints in torsion using four different compressive preload conditions in healthy and degenerated lumbar discs—with, and without facet joints. The study also sought to develop a quantitative relationship between structure and function in tissue and torsion mechanics. The study found that annulus fibrosis GAG content substantially affects the mechanics of disc torsion.

Purpose of the Study

Because there is a large population of lower back pain (LBP) sufferers whose jobs involve excessive loading and rotating the lumbar spine, the authors of this study sought to quantify and understand how the facet joints in healthy and degenerated discs would behave under axial rotation scenarios. They did this by observing in vivo changes in spinal segments during torsional behavior. The intervertebral disc (IVD) is capable of stability and flexibility during most movement, receiving stresses and sharing them with the nearby facet joints and other surrounding structures. The facet joints should protect the disc from overload and degeneration by restricting motions that would cause damage to the spine, but some complex motions that involve axial rotation and bending during heavy loading can increase the chance of micro-damage and disc failure. How well the IVD and facet joints share loads is determined by the mode of loading and posture. Previous studies have demonstrated that up to 25 percent of axial compressive forces may be supported by the facet joints. Between 40 to 65 percent of healthy disc joint rotational and shear forces are also supported by the facet joints. Therefore, it is important to understand how the facet joints in healthy and degenerated discs react during torsion.

Study Design

Researchers obtained and imaged seven human cadaveric lumbar spine segments aged 43 to 80 years-old. The musculature and ligaments were then removed, and the intact facet joints near the discs were subdivided mid-vertebrae prior to the samples being potted in bone cement. The segments were then wrapped in gauze and stored in a phosphate solution until brought to room temperature just before testing. They were then mounted onto a testing machine and secured with screws.

The segments underwent a moderate-to-low preloaded axial compression, followed by axial rotation through the center of the disc. The cycles of compression and rotation were performed for two hours to allow the formation of creep. Ten cycles of cyclic rotation, and the samples were tested under four axial compressive preloads and allowed to recover between each test. The facet joints were then removed, and the samples were tested again, using the same loading configuration. For each round of testing, the researchers recorded the levels of force, rotation angle, displacement, and torque.

Isolating and Imaging Each Disc

Each disc was isolated and imaged after mechanical testing. Researchers measured the disc area, anterior-posterior and lateral width using a custom algorithm. Disc height was measured from the posterior, anterior, left, and right lateral sides, as well as the center. A mathematic formula determined the applied axial stress, and the images were graded and compared with radiographic-based grades.

Conclusion

The results of the tests indicated a strong correlation between creep and axial compressive preload and the loss of disc height. Removing the facet joint had no effect on this phenomenon. The presence of facet joints and an axial compressive preload did have a strong effect on torsional mechanical properties, with torsional stiffness and range decreased 50 to 60 percent for compressive loads after removing the facet joints. Energy absorption decreased about 70 percent during rotation after facetectomy, and disc-joint strain increased 74 percent, compared to only 62 percent in disc strain energy using the same axial compression.

Annulus Fibrosis GAG content in degenerated discs greatly reduced torsion mechanics, while the facet joints are integral in keeping the spine from rotating too far and helping to reduce shear stress and damage to the disc. The relationship between the biochemical-mechanical and compression-torsion levels noted in this study may help to provide for more effective and targeted biological repair methods for degenerating discs of various levels.

 

KEYWORDS: AF GAG Content Alters the Mechanics of Disc Torsion, role of facet joints in torsion, axial rotation scenarios, correlation between creep and axial compressive preload and the loss of disc height, targeted biological repair methods for degenerating discs

Summary
Study Finds Annulus Fibrosus GAG Content Alters the Mechanics of Disc Torsion
Article Name
Study Finds Annulus Fibrosus GAG Content Alters the Mechanics of Disc Torsion
Description
A recent study evaluated the role of facet joints in torsion using four different compressive preload conditions in healthy and degenerated lumbar discs—with, and without facet joints.
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Publisher Name
Dynamic Disc Designs
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4 replies
  1. Bill
    Bill says:

    So if you if you engage in 50-100 spinal rotations ( including practice swings) in a 3-4 hour period, which would be the case in an 18-hole round of golf, would it be a good practice to perform regular spinal decompression exercises during the round?

    Reply

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