facet osteoarthritis

Facet osteoarthritis pain is common and thought to be a significant contributor to back pain in the US. Within the United States, it costs 100 Billion dollars annually to combat this endemic problem. However, back pain can originate from many anatomical structures, and the facet joint is only one of them but thought by many as significant. Other common pain structures are the intervertebral discs in the case of disc bulges, disc extrusions, disc protrusions and frank nuclear sequestration. There are also more severe causes of back pain like aneurysm and other organ pathology, so it is crucial to have a professional look carefully at the diagnostics of each case.

In the case of mechanical lower back pain (others use the term non-specific lower back pain), the facet joint garners good attention. The word ‘facet’ comes from the French facette (12c., Old French facete), diminutive of face “face, appearance” and are two anatomical structures that reside behind the intervertebral disc.

Facet osteoarthritis

Modeling facet osteoarthritis is tricky because of the complexity of motion at the spinal level. The intervertebral disc height plays a role with respective facet compression because it resides on the front of the spinal motion segment. It is this compression thought to be contributing to back pain.

Clincally, facet osteoarthritis pain is often unilateral in nature

In a study conducted recently 1, researchers worked to induce facet joint arthritis by creating compression with a spring. Over time the researchers found the increased expression of interleukin‑1β and tumour necrosis factor‑α expression. In other words, with more compression elapsing over time, the more the expression of the molecules related to many low back pain patients.

This is an important study linking the mechanics of compression and the associated physiology of molecules, which are thought to be markers of back pain patients.

At Dynamic Disc Designs, we have developed models to help explain the associated compression of facet joints as it relates to disc height loss and gains. We are committed to bringing the best in modelling. Explore our website for more.

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