News for Dynamic Disc Designs which includes updated research and a synthesis of the most updated studies to help efficiently engage with patients and their back and neck pain.

We take an approach that an evidence-based practitioner would take. Carefully dissecting the history of a patients complaints, weaving the mechanical and psychosocial factors and then deliver a rational and tangible approach to relieving the back pain to the patient. Our news helps keep the practitioner abreast of the latest publications related to musculoskeletal health.

At our headquarters, we dedicate weekly hours to comb through the research for those who treat back pain and neck pain and deliver it.

arthritic changes, lumbar models, cervical models

Arthritic changes are very common. They are often related to a person’s pain with neck pain as one of the highest ranked common causes of disability. In this specific research article 1, the authors looked at the micro-details of neck synovial joints. With osteoarthritis known to be related to neck pain, they were looking to reveal higher anatomical detail and they were also curious about whether men or women have more of these problems.

With both neck and back pain being multifactorial (which may include both psychological and social aspects) degenerative changes within the synovial joints play a significant structural role with the development of spondylosis. This is a general term to describe a disorder of the musculoskeletal system with an emphasis on joint space narrowing, intervertebral disc height loss and frequent formation of bony spurs.

The architecture of the cervical facet joints is quite well known with most of the current knowledge around the smooth (or lack of smoothness) hyaline cartilage to allow the joint to receive and distribute loads in an efficient manner. However, there has not been much quantitative data revealing the anatomy under the hyaline cartilage designated as the subchondral bone. This bone under the cartilage (sub, meaning below and chondral, meaning cartilage) has been of recent interest as there exist nerves in this area that can cause pain. This is thought to be similar to the basivertebral nerve of the vertebral body. The innervation of the facet, however, has ascending fibres travelling through the posterior primary division which can be seen in this Medial Branch Dynamic Disc Model.

 

modeling hyaline cartilage, models

Hyaline Cartilage Modeling in our Professional and Academic LxH Dynamic Disc Models

basivertebral nerve lumbar model

Basivertebral nerve of a lumbar vertebra.

Previous research has shown that the thickness of the hyaline cartilage is .4mm in women and .5mm in men with the subchondral bone making up approximately 5% of the total cartilage thickness. It is also known that with increasing age the cartilage starts to flake off (called fibrillation) and researchers also coin the stripping of cartilage from the bone, denudation. This means being nude. A joint surface within a covering. Other terms used to describe the break down of the hyaline cartilage is erosion, fissuring and deformation. All in all, the terminology all mean that the hyaline is thinning.

arthritic changes, subchondral, joint, model

Subchondral thickening – arthritic changes

How did they do it?

These researchers looked at 72 recently deceased people and examined their joints. They used microscopes to look closely at the facet joints to help understand the pathogenesis of the arthritic changes.

When they observed the osteocartilaginous junction, the morphological changes included: flaking, splitting, eburnation, fissuring, blood vessel invasion and osteophytes. They looked at the length of the cartilage, the hyaline cartilage thickness, the calcified cartilage thickness and the subchondral bone thickness.

They found that males tended to have more severe degenerative changes described by flaking and severe fissures in the facet cartilage. Click To Tweet

Points of Key Interest

  • this was a study that looked at 1132 unique cervical spine facets from 72 humans
  • males were found to have more degenerative changes of the osteocartilaginous junction
  • the thickness of the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone increased with age whereas the hyaline cartilage decreased
  • the osteocartilaginous junction is particularly important in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in the cervical spine facet joints

 

At Dynamic Disc Designs, we work to bring research to the practitioner so when there is a teaching moment, Professionals are ready to explain pain triggers as they relate to a patients symptoms and movements. Empowering people about their own anatomy helps in the crafting of customized treatment plans for each unique pain patient. Explore our dynamic models and help a patient understand their arthritic changes and what that means to them.

A new study 1 sought to create an etiology-based system of classification by identifying and characterizing typical endplate irregularities and found that tidemark avulsions were a predominant pathology in the cadaveric spine sample images. This represents a previously unidentified observation and, along with the histologic classification system developed in the study, should assist practitioners in organizing their patients into categories that will help to diagnose, research, and treat their spine symptoms.

 

The Study

Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to analyze and categorize 15 donated human cadaveric spines from 11 males and four females between the ages of 49 to 67 years old. Each of the spine samples showed evidence of moderate to severe disc degeneration. Motion segments were excluded if they appeared with imaging to have experienced pre-mortem surgery, deformity, or fracture. No medical history about the donors was obtained.

Histological Observation

Spinal segments were extracted using a band saw, and their various features were stained with different colors for observation. Each of the sections were imaged with polarized lights under a microscope, and two raters developed a classification system to identify and record various focal tissue-scale endplate irregularities and their anatomical location.

Researchers noticed a novel histological phenomenon wherein there appeared to be a separation of the annulus from the vertebra at the tidemark (the insertion point of outer annular fibers into the calcified layer of cartilage). They immune-stained the “tidemark avulsions” to search for the 9.5 neuronal marker protein gene using a polymer detection system. Each of the slides was then analyzed to identify the presence or absence of nerves in the bone nearest the endplate irregularity.

endplate irregulariities, models

Models to help explain back pain as it relates to endplate irregularities.

MRI Analysis

Each spine was studied via MRI to identify the presence of absence of tidemark avulsions, and their location was noted. Two orthopedic specialist clinicians were used to assess the findings. These researchers—neither of whom was previously used as a rater— were blinded to the histologic findings.

Findings

The endplate irregularities were grouped into three categories based upon their features and location. They were then subcategorized to further classify their pathologies.

The categories and subcategories identified were:

  • Avulsions: There was a separation of the tissue at the place where the disc joined the vertebra. Two types of avulsions were observed—tidemark (separation occurring at the tidemark location, where outer annulus fibers join the layer of calcified cartilage, and CEP-bone avulsion—occurring where the bone meets the cartilage endplate (CEP).
  • Nodes: Traumatic nodes occurred when there was a herniation of the nuclear materials reaching through the endplate. When abnormal fibrocartilage ingrowth or bony erosions were found, the were classified as Erosive.
  • Rim degeneration: This classification was reserved for samples that showed loss of organization in the annular fiber, bone marrow alterations, or degradation of the bone-marrow interface.

Endplate Irregularity Observations

The most common irregularities noted were rim degeneration (50 %) and avulsions (35%). Nodes were less common (15%) and found mostly in the thoracic spine, where the avulsions and rim degenerations were found in the lumbar spine samples. Eighty-seven percent of the noted avulsions were found in the anterior discs.

Though linear regression showed little association between endplate irregularities and age, the largest number of tidemark avulsions (90%) were found in the oldest spine samples. Interestingly, the annular fibers in the tidemark avulsions appeared to change their direction after crossing the tidemark. Of the 35 discs that showed tidemark avulsions, 14 of them contained multiple avulsions. Marrow changes and increased innervation was noted along vertebral bones beside endplate irregularities. An increase of nerve density was observed even in bones adjacent to very small tidemark avulsions.

Conclusion

The ability to identify tidemark avulsions on MRI may help practitioners identify and treat disc-vertebra injuries in a targeted way. High density images in the study showed that fluid can collect around avulsion irregularities, potentially creating gas in the extra-cellular spaces surrounding thee separation. High-intensity regions in MRI may indicate disc delamination or potentially painful lesions.  It is possible that tidemark avulsions may create anterior widening and create a scenario wherein the disc may detach from the vertebra. Overall, the findings of this study should contribute to a beneficial system of classification, allowing clinicians to more effectively diagnose and treat their lower back pain patients.

KEYWORDS: endplate irregularities, tidemark avulsions, endplate pathologies, histologic classification system, separation of the annulus from the vertebra at the tidemark, CEP-bone avulsion, traumatic nodes, rim degeneration

 

A cross-sectional study 1of the multifidus muscles (MM) and erector spinae muscles of 68 women and 42 men found significantly higher levels of muscles in subjects without disc herniation than in the disc herniation group, indicating that chronic pressure on the root of the spinal nerve may cause degeneration and atrophy of the MM and erector spinae muscles groups.

 

Single-Level Disc Herniation

Model of Single-Level Disc Herniation.

 

The Study

110 LBP patients with an average age of 40 were analyzed and divided into two groups—those with single-level disc degeneration, and those without disc degeneration. Subjects with multilevel degeneration were excluded, as were those with deformities of the spine or a history of spinal surgeries. Both groups were radiographed via MRI at the lumbar levels, and the imaging results were compared to examine the paravertebral muscles, disc heights, and perpendicular distances between the laminae and MM. Statistical analysis using software compared the variables using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to investigate data distribution.

Results

The LBP patients without lumbar disc herniation had clinically-significant greater MM and erector spinae muscles than those with radiographically-confirmed disc degeneration. No significant differences existed, however, in the disc heights, perpendicular distances between the MM and the laminae, or the psoas major cross-sectional areas of the two study groups.

Discussion

The MM stabilizes the lumbar spine and, when negatively impacted, contributes to LBP. The muscle group create more force over a smaller range than the longer spine muscle groups, which helps to stabilize movement. The dorsal rami of the spinal nerves stimulates the MM and erector spinae, but the psoas major is stimulated by ventral rami lumbar spinal branches, prior to their joining the lumbar plexus. The medial paraspinal muscles are stimulated from one nerve root, but the iliocostalis and longissimus muscles receives stimulation from many roots. Indications of muscle degeneration include decreased muscle size and increased fat deposits in the area.

Because the MM and erector spinae are stimulated by the dorsal root stemming from a singular level, the chronic and long-lasting pressure on the root due to disc herniation contributes to the degeneration and atrophy of these muscles. This atrophy is not evident in the psoas muscle because it is stimulated by the nerves of many different levels, rather than a singular source. In order for muscle atrophy to occur, there must be at least six weeks of compression, according to this study’s authors.

Conclusion

Evidence of increased fatty deposits and decreased muscle in a cross-sectional lumbar image indicates the existence of muscle degeneration in LBP patients, assuming there has been at least six weeks of compression on the MM or erector spinae muscle groups, which are stimulated by a single nerve root.

 

KEYWORDS: Muscle Degeneration in LBP Patients with Single-Level Disc Herniation, single-level disc degeneration, paravertebral muscles, disc heights, and perpendicular distances between the laminae and MM, pressure on the root due to disc herniation contributes to the degeneration and atrophy of these muscles

  1. Volumetric Muscle Measurements Indicate Significant Muscle Degeneration in Single-Level Disc Herniation Patients
lower back pain

A data review of how education of patients suffering from lower back pain (LBP) in a primary care setting affects their psychological state found moderate-to-high evidence that when primary care physicians provided information on the condition, their patients were reassured and experienced long-term healthy and psychological benefits.

patient education

Although it has been long-established that reassurance from a medical practitioner improves patient outcomes, it is also true that reassuring non-specific illness patients without educating them about their condition can contribute to stress, which can precipitate chronic pain and expensive, recurring health care costs.

Because LBP patients are often discouraged from receiving costly diagnostic imaging tests, they may not experience the reassurance that comes from understanding the source of their pain. Though only 25 percent of physicians in the UK currently order imaging as a matter of course, the number is increasing as the benefits of patient reassurance become more evident.

Another means of patient reassurance involves preplanned educational materials that explain the condition in understandable language. Booklets, diagrams, and dynamic devices that clearly demonstrate the health problem and how it can be treated may have beneficial health and psychological effects on LBP in a clinical setting, but there have been few studies to validate the effectiveness of these intervention methods. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine how patient education would increase reassurance in LBP patients and to determine which method of intervention was most effective.

Methods

A literature review of identified, eligible studies was conducted in November of 2013 and repeated in June of 2014. The studies reviewed involved LBP patient education, advice, reassurance, information, counselling, and consultation in clinical trial settings. Eligibility included LBP adult patients with acute or subacute conditions in clinical trials where more than 70 percent of the patients reported symptoms and where the interventions were conducted in a primary care setting, with at least one patient education element, either written or verbal, that provided reassurance.

Results

The data analysis of the review suggested, with moderate-to-high quality evidence, that patients with LBP are reassured when they receive education about their condition from their primary care provider and that the positive effects of the intervention are still evident at a one-year follow-up consultation. The evidence also showed that receiving education about their LBP during their initial primary care visit reduced the amount of LBP health-care visits over a one-year period. A sub-group review also determined that patients were more reassured when they received education about their condition directly from their physician, rather than from a nurse of a physiotherapist.

Discussion

The results of this review indicate that physicians who can provide their LBP patients with structured, understandable educational materials about their condition are more successful in reassuring their patients, who continue to have lasting health and psychological benefits for up to a year after their initial consultation. Because patients with LBP typically endure numerous costly treatments and may suffer from chronic pain and stress, it would be beneficial for primary care physicians to prepare educational materials that could lead to a more successful treatment outcome and reduced financial burden for their patients.

spine models, patient education, anatomy models

Dynamic spine models – Patient Education for Spine

KEYWORDS: educating lower back pain patients, patients suffering from lower back pain, patient reassurance, patient education, diagnostic imaging tests, psychological effects of LBP

A recent study  1 mapped the rate of water diffusion in intervertebral discs (IVD) of lower back pain (LBP) patients using MRI and a software program to develop an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), or in vivo water proton measurement, shortly after spinal manipulation on the subjects. The results of the study indicate a short-term increase in apparent diffusion could be responsible for the immediate improvements in pain and mobility after a spinal manipulation, though chronic LBP sufferers, whose fissured and ruptured discs allow for more diffusion than typical healthy discs, may be less likely to experience the immediate benefits of mobilization than their acute LBP-suffering counterparts.

 

The Study

Eleven women and five men diagnosed with acute idiopathic LBP were recruited from a physical therapy practice over a six-month period. Their average age was 46 years-old, and they were included in the study based upon a shared complaint of acute LBP or stiffness of a duration less than six weeks, less pain days than non-pain days, with at least one asymptomatic month between the current and previous LBP episodes. Patients were excluded from the study if they suffered from chronic LBP, were resistant to spinal manipulation, had suffered a spinal fracture, felt pain radiating below the knee, previous spinal surgery, had osteoporosis, were pregnant, had any sort of metal implants that might interfere with the MRI machine, suffered from mental health problems, obesity, claustrophobia, substance abuse or cognitive disability.

The subjects received an explanation of the procedure and completed questionnaires about their levels of neuropathy and LBP prior to having their lumbar region scanned via MRI. After the initial scan, a spinal mobilization by an Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapist (OMPT) was performed in an adjacent room, with a scale beneath the OMPT’s feet measuring the weight change during the PA mobilization. Within the hour, another MRI scan was taken of the patients, and they were asked to answer a series of questions to rate their pain and mobility levels, post-treatment. The entire process took roughly 90 minutes per patient.

The images were analyzed visually and through a data software program in relation to each participant’s rate of a water molecule and nutrient diffusion and the sequences of diffusion pre-and post-manipulation. The images were interpreted by a single investigator and radiologist, and the ADC was calculated and verified. Clinical pain and mobility changes were noted and combined with the MRI changes before and after the PA mobilization computations were achieved.

Results

There was a clinically-significant increase in ADC values across all anatomical levels, except for L2-S1 and L2-L3. The biggest changes occurred at L3-L4, and L4-L5. The pain ratings also saw a significant reduction post-mobilization across the subjects after mobilization. These results agree with previous similar study findings, but they offer new insights into acute LBP diffusion and that of older study subjects than in previous studies. Dr. Fryer’s research was referenced in this paper. Click To Tweet The findings of this study may indicate that the phenomenon of mobilization may not be responsible for the improvement of discogenic pain and increased water diffusion, but it is clear that pain, mobility, and diffusion are linked, and mobilization during the acute phases of LBP can temporarily provide increased flow to the IVD, allowing it to expand and decrease pressure and stress on the surrounding nerves. The improved fluid-flow may also help to remove obstructions, irritants, and debris from the IVD, which could also improve function and pain levels, post-manipulation.

Mobilization during the acute phases of LBP can temporarily provide increased flow to the IVD, allowing it to expand and decrease pressure and stress on the surrounding nerves. Click To Tweet

Though there was an overall four percent reduction in ADC between typical and slightly degenerated IVDs, the subjects with more severe degeneration had five percent higher levels of diffusion—probably due to fluids collecting in the fissures in the nucleus, created by the disc degeneration. Thus, spinal thrust significantly increased ADC values for those with mild or no degeneration but was less effective in those with more degeneration.

KEYWORDS: Spinal Mobilization Credited to Increased Apparent Diffusion, in vivo water proton measurement, shortly after spinal manipulation, short-term increase in apparent diffusion could be responsible for the immediate improvements in pain and mobility after a spinal manipulation, mobilization during the acute phases of LBP can temporarily provide increased flow to the IVD

cervical hydraulic recovery with recumbancy

A retrospective study 1. [Clinical Relationship of Degenerative Changes between the Cervical and Lumbar Spine] reviewing MRIs of 152 back patients showed a positive correlation between cervical and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in patients presenting with lumbar spondylosis. The results suggest the necessity of screening LBP patients for evidence of cervical IDD.

Introduction

The diagnosis of IDD may be complicated by the patient’s pain patterns and the tendency of practitioners to focus only on the area of discomfort. Studies have demonstrated the interrelatedness of spinal kinematics, reflexes, and complex neurogenic responses in IVD degeneration, but few studies have examined the connection between degenerative changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, as it relates to diagnosis. This study’s aim was to quantify the possible correlation, which could lead to better diagnostic and treatment outcomes for future IDD patients.

 

Method

Positional MRIs of 152 patients presenting with cervical or lumbar spondylosis were reviewed and assessed and graded on a scale of 1 to 5 for every spinal segment. A degenerative disc score (DDS) was achieved by summing the grades across all segments, after which, the subjects were divided into two groups based upon their IDD for each spinal segment. The “normal” group received a grade of 1 to 2; the “degenerative” group had grades of between 3 and 5. The groups were then compared for evidence of a positive correlation.

Results

A review of the two groups showed a positive correlation between DDS of the cervical and lumbar spine, with higher cervical DDSs at the upper lumber segments than at the lower degenerative segments. This indicates that patients demonstrating degenerations in the upper lumbar spinal segments are likely to suffer from some cervical spondylosis on further examination, regardless of whether they are currently symptomatic.

Conclusion

Patients with lumbar degeneration should also be screened for cervical spondylosis, particularly if their lumbar degeneration is present in the L1 to L3, to reduce the likelihood of a missed cervical degeneration diagnosis. Click To Tweet

KEYWORDS: positive correlation between cervical and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration, better diagnostic and treatment outcomes for future IDD patients, the interrelatedness of spinal kinematics, reflexes, and complex neurogenic responses, patients demonstrating degenerations in the upper lumbar spinal segments are likely to suffer from some cervical spondylosis

Physician-Patient Communication

A qualitative phenomenological study of 15 musculoskeletal patients and their physiotherapists found that patients were better able to express their concerns and outcome expectations when their practitioners utilized a patient-centric, communicative approach during their initial healthcare consultation. When practitioners were well-versed in contemporary pain and pathology theories, they were better able to anticipate and elicit feedback about their patients’ concerns, leading to a more positive dialogue and better patient satisfaction. Practitioners who have developed systems and approaches to encourage proactive communication from their patients about their health concerns were more likely to have positive patient outcomes than those who relied only upon their prior medical expertise in diagnosing and treating their patients.

Purpose of the Study

Recent healthcare approaches have trended away from the strictly traditional biomedical paradigm to include the biopsychosocial approach to patient consultation and treatment. The newer model recognizes the importance of communication in empowering patients to take an active role in their own treatment and encourages them to consider and express their own health agendas, allowing their clinicians to more fully understand and attend to their specific healthcare needs. To develop a true partnership with their patients, healthcare practitioners must be willing to abandon the “doctor knows best” attitude and develop better communication skills that will allow for a patient-clinician treatment collaboration. This study proposed to investigate the relationship between a clinician’s communication technique and skills and how well the patient was able to express healthcare concerns during an initial consultation.

Methods

15 musculoskeletal patients and their physiotherapists were interviewed after an initial consultation encounter of between 15 and 20 minutes, which was recorded and later analyzed, utilizing predetermined topic guides, including: presenting problems and symptoms; understanding diagnosis theories, how the patients reacted to referrals, the behavior of the clinician during the consultation, desirable and undesirable treatment activities, fears, concerns, and emotional or social issues related to the patient’s treatment or diagnosis.

Findings

Each of the patients involved in the study presented with a range of two to five topics they wanted to discuss with their clinician. The data determined three main themes when it came to important topics of patient-clinician communication during consultations:

Clarity of the patient’s agenda

The first theme identified was how clear or unstructured a patient’s agenda was during their consultation. Some patients had very clear health agendas and were able to communicate their expectations and needs effectively to their clinician. Others were more passive and had more difficulty in communicating their expectations. These patients would have likely benefitted from a practitioner who was better able to create an atmosphere of trust and confidence, which would encourage the patient to discuss their needs.

The need for information and understanding

Patients who had more information about and better understood their health concerns were better at identifying and expressing their expectations and needs during their consultation. The subjects reported being more satisfied with and reassured by their consultation when their clinician took the time to explain and discuss the healthcare issue with them, rather than simply offering a diagnosis and treatment plan. When the clinicians offered evidence-based information regarding their diagnosis and reassurance that their health problem was not due to a serious underlying condition or likely to create too much disruption in their lives, they felt more satisfied with their experience. They were also happier about their consultation when their clinician was able to illicit further information regarding their symptoms and concerns, especially when the patients had neglected to mention these concerns, either through forgetfulness or reluctance to communicate their fears.

Developing Collaboration

Patients in the study reported feeling more supported and engaged when their healthcare provider used a person-centered approach during the interview at their initial consultation. They were better able to trust and have confidence in providers that projected a sense of partnership and were concerned with the social, emotional and physical condition of their patients, rather than treating their dysfunction as a stand-alone concern.

The results of this study emphasize the need for clinicians to create an atmosphere of trust, collaboration, and communication in their patient consultations, rather than relying exclusively on their medical expertise during diagnosis and treatment. By encouraging their patients to more effectively communicate their healthcare concerns, and by creating an atmosphere of collaboration between themselves and their patients, healthcare providers can empower and reassure their patients, which may improve diagnosis, treatment, and healthcare outcomes.

 

KEYWORDS: Importance of Physician-to-Patient Communication, patient-centric, communicative approach, clinician’s communication technique and skills, desirable and undesirable treatment activities, fears, concerns, emotional or social issues related to the patient’s treatment or diagnosis