LBP and Disability

A cross-section study 1, in Spine, was conducted to investigate the link low back pain (LBP) and disability had with the structural features of the thoracolumbar fascia. The results shared that a relationship existed between these factors.

The Context

While the Global Burden of Disease Study has researched LBP to be the leading cause of disability in humans, a lot of work needs to be done to fully understand the etiology associated with LBP. More research needs to be done to address all of the factors linked to LBP. Such understanding is crucial because it will help with creating targeted prevention strategies to help millions around the globe.

Previous research has analyzed LBP and disability to be associated with structural abnormalities of the lumbar spine. Furthermore, MRI has shown LBP to be linked to disc protrusion, disc degeneration, nerve root displacement or compression, and high-intensity zone. While more research is still needed, the present results do suggest that the issues of LBP and disability can be addressed by targeting structural factors. Take note, there’s evidence that suggests the thoracolumbar fascia may be linked to LBP. However, few MRI studies have examined such a link.

hypermobility-spine

The Study

The current study had an aim to examine the link present between the lumbar fascia’s length and LBP as well as disability. The study used MRI.

A total of 72 participants (49 females and 23 males) were recruited. They weren’t required to have any history of LBP or current LBP to participate. The MRI was performed, in this study, using a 3.0-T magnetic resonance unit (with the participants in supine position). The study administered the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire (CPG) at the time of the MRI.

The study used the Logistic regression analyses for examining any likely associations between fascial length and high pain intensity (or disability).

What did the Results Conclude?

The results of the study concluded that there was a significant association between a shorter length of fascia and high-intensity LBP and/or disability. Such association was after adjusting gender, age, and the body mass index. The association was strengthened after adjustment for the cross-section area (in the paraspinal compartment).

While more studies are required, the current results do suggest that fascia’s structural features likely play a role in disability and LBP.

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